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Using scheduling to reduce costs

Scheduling gives you the ability to have a bird’s eye view on your organization, which in turn - when used correctly - can help you reduce costs significantly.


Scheduling is essentially the process of deciding how best commit your resources between a variety of different tasks: you know, what resources are at your disposal (by resources I mean people, machinery, equipment) and what tasks have to be done.
Scheduling gives you the comfort and assurance that all deadlines will be met on time, but at the same time, if used properly, can also be used to analyze working processes altogether and thus offer an opportunity to cut costs and increase efficiency.

Be specific!
When assigning tasks to your resources (to people, in most cases), be specific! Always!
You might think that you are, but in fact most of us tend to be slaves to our own habits, so for example, when scheduling a time for a meeting, that usually takes 2 hours, schedule it for 1 hour and see what happens. A shorter meeting might motivate your team to work faster, optimize time consumption and be more on point. If that proposal works, you’ve just saved 1 hour of working time for each of the team members and just by breaking a habit and making a change in the schedule.
Or perhaps there’s a similar issue with the lunch break: everyone has officially a 1 hour lunch break, but in fact, it’s more like an hour and a half. Is this familiar?
You can avoid this by scheduling a task right after the lunch break. People are more inclined to have a longer lunch, if there’s not a specific task waiting for them at the office.

Think logically!
There are tasks and then there are tasks. If you are using a system, where members of the team themselves can assign themselves tasks, be sure to keep an eye on that.
As booking is something, that is usually easier, than the tasks, it’s relatively simple to assign one’s self a task that takes 3 hours to complete, when only 1 hour would suffice. By having a visual scheduling tool, you can keep an eye on things, while intervening when necessary. By separating the wheat from the chaff you can increase efficiency in no time.

By Indrek Kuldkepp